Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence

Domestic violence is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship. It is behavior that includes physical, emotional, and psychological or sexual harm, sometimes several of these forms occurring at any one time. Domestic violence does not discriminate. Victims can be of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion or gender. It can happen to people who are married, living together or just dating. It affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Women are abused in higher numbers with almost 91 to 95% of adult domestic violence being committed against women by their male partners.

On a typical day in the U.S. in 2021:

38,608

Adult and child victims of domestic violence found refuge in emergency shelters, transitional housing, or other housing provided by local domestic violence programs

31,424

Non-residential adult and child victims received support services including counseling, legal advocacy, and transportation

20,701

Calls received by domestic violence hotlines, an average of more than 14 contacts every minute of the day

9,444

Requests for services that domestic violence programs could not provide because they lacked the resources

2020 STATISTICS IN TEXAS ALONE

23%

Increase in domestic violence-related homicides

228

People killed by an intimate partner

21

Domestic violence-related fatalities in Dallas County

183

Women killed by their intimate partners

120

Men shot and killed women who were current or former intimate partners

40

Men killed by their female partners

300

Children lost one or more parents to domestic violence

256,078

Calls to domestic violence emergency hotlines

1,500,000

Services provided through state-funded domestic violence programs

43.7%

Adult domestic violence victims denied shelter due to lack of space

SOURCE: Texas Council on Family Violence

Exerting strict control (financial, interaction with family or friends, appearance, mobility).

Emotional abuse including insulting, criticizing, or humiliating in front of other people.

Extreme jealousy, possessiveness, and accusations of lying, cheating, etc.

Signs that your partner is being abusive

Use of threats or intimidation to manipulate actions.

Unexplained injuries or explanations that don’t quite add up.

Isolation from family and friends.

Feelings of fear in their presence due to anger, destruction of property, or violent outbursts.

Reference: Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV)

Address

P. O. Box 860911 Plano, TX 75074

Phone

(972) 424-7775

Fax

(972) 424-7779